✅ The Shock of the New PDF / Epub ⚣ Author Robert Hughes – Dileydi.be

The Shock of the New A Beautifully Illustrated Hundred Year History Of Modern Art, From Cubism To Pop And Avant Garde More Than 250 Color Photos.


10 thoughts on “The Shock of the New

  1. says:

    Again today I was lost in admiration of this history with attitude of 20th century art I think it s the best single art book I ve read It s stuffed full of ideas and sentences that refresh like a splash of seaspray Viewing Paris from the Eiffel Tower in 1889 was one of the pivots in human consciousness The phonograph was the most radical extension of cultural memory since the photograph Cezanne takes you backstage In cubist paintings the world was a twitching skin of nuances Mach Again today I was lost in admiration of this history with attitude of 20th century art I think it s the best single art book I ve read It s stuffed full of ideas and sentences that refresh like a splash of seaspray Viewing Paris from the Eiffel Tower in 1889 was one of the pivots in human consciousness The phonograph was the most radical extension of cultural memory since the photograph Cezanne takes you backstage In cubist paintings the world was a twitching skin of nuances Machines were the ideal metaphor for that central pornographic fantasy of the 19th century, rape followed by gratitude To make socialist art, one must stop depicting ownable things in short, go abstract The idea that fascism always preferred retrograde to advanced art is simply...


  2. says:

    My favorite story about modern art comes from my friend I ll let her tell it So I was in the Museum of Modern Art one day, you know, walking around and stuff I walked in one room and I saw this thing on the wall, and it looked really weird So I bent down and started to look at it There was this other visitor, who started looking at it too Then all of the sudden the wall opened and a man walked out Me and the other visitor looked at each other and laughed It was a doorknob I love this sto My favorite story about modern art comes from my friend I ll let her tell it So I was in the Museum of Modern Art one day, you know, walking around and stuff I walked in one room and I saw this thing on the wall, and it looked really weird So I bent down and started to look at it There was this other visitor, who started looking at it too Then all of the sudden the wall opened and a man walked out Me and the other visitor looked at each other and laughed It was a doorknob I love this story because it neatly encapsulates how so many of us feel in museums dedicated to modern art There we are, surrounded by objects and images that are alternately baffling, confusing, random, bizarre, boring, interesting, ugly, beautiful, or any combination of the above We don t know what we re looking at or how to look at it and yet we are asked to treat it with a great deal of seriousness and respect Some people get angry and mourn the death of art some write art criticism, much of it equa...


  3. says:

    The first few episodes of this I watched this, by the way, but will need to get hold of the book now are nearly entirely a rip off of Walter Benjamin s work, particularly his Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction The modern has been so dominated by machines and the question of how machines relate to humans is an open question that continues to haunt our nightmares The Matrix movies are a particul...


  4. says:

    I bought this book after a trip to the Museum of Modern Art in New York I left the museum confused and annoyed by Modern art I could not find anything to explain Modern art Nothing that wasn t complete unreadable, unwatchable or incomprehensible Then I picked up this book I read about 30 pages in the book store and couldn t put it down Robert Hughes prose flows, clear and crisp I like that he could explain an artist s work in a way th...


  5. says:

    Most of the other reviews say it all this weighty and expensive book was the main text of my college class on Modern Art but but boy was it worth it Hughes is such a succinct, perceptive historian and critic he takes complicated topics and doesn t simply examine then, but unpacks and illuminates Probab...


  6. says:

    A brilliant book to finish off my challenge for this year, Hughes has a way of explaining complex cultural issues that just sticks with me and makes so much sense He does though have a tendency to use phrases and turns of phrase in French or Italian or Latin and just expect readers to know them, I had to use Google Translate, and they still often made absolutely no sense at all Oh, and it s quite obvious when he doesn t personally like an artist, as his analysis tends towards the I suppose th A brilliant book to finish off my challenge for this year, Hughes has a way of explaining complex cultural issues that just sticks with me and makes so much sense He does though have a tendency to use phrases and turns of phrase in French or Italian or Latin and just expect readers to know them, I had to use Google Translate, and they still often made absolutely no sense at all Oh, and it s quite obvious when he doesn t personally like an artist, as his analysis tends towards the I suppose this artist has some merit, if you re mad end of the spectrum But those are the only criticisms I can make of a wo...


  7. says:

    Hughes opinionated and politically charged biography of modern art and its dialogue with a culture in turmoil is always on the side of the radical against the status quo He is harshly critical of the academy and establishment, and of regressive regimes, movements and critiques He hates oppression, elitism, and frivolous self indulgence, which is his general opinion of postmodernism.The Shock of the New was a hugely important part of my education, helping me to become conversant in the movemen Hughes opinionated and politically charged biography of modern art and its dialogue with a culture in turmoil is always on the side of the radical against the status quo He is harshly critical of the academy and establishment, and of regressive regimes, movements and critiques He hates oppression, elitism, and frivolous self indu...


  8. says:

    Hughes possesses all the essential traits of a brilliant art critic he s not a snob, he s perceptive about the difference between shyte and wank, he s enthusiastic about playfulness and populism, and he s willing to admit he s wrong in this book, it s Philip Guston The fact that his career was centered upon TIME Magazine is a testament to his sense of populist principle, and evidence that there really are no other brilliant art critics out there I had my hopes for Dave Hickey way back when Hughes possesses all the essential traits of a brilliant art critic he s not a snob, he s perceptive about the difference between shyte and wank, he s enthusiastic about playfulness and populism, and he s willing to admit he s wrong in this book, it s Philip Guston The fact that his career was centered upon TIME Magazine is a testament to his sense of populist principle, and evidence that there really are no other brilliant art critics out there I...


  9. says:

    Great text about the history of modern art, from the influence of the impressionists forward It is fun to read, and does a good job of correlating the history of a given time to the ideology of a movement in art If you think you don t like modern art, read this book


  10. says:

    This was an epic read for me I saw Hughes give an interview on Charlie Rose and kept his book in mind until I ran across it at my favorite book store in LA.I ve read a few art history books before, and this one stands out Artists and movements flush together as Hughes never takes a break What this torrent of information provides is an incredible sense of interconnectedness across art, as well as a cl...