Read ✓ The Joy Luck Club By Amy Tan – Dileydi.be



10 thoughts on “The Joy Luck Club

  1. says:

    During high school, when I did not have the life experience to fully appreciate her work, I read each of Amy Tan s books as they came out Now, years later, with many other books and various experiences under my belt, I reread The Joy Luck Club, Tan s first book, as part of my March Women s History Month lineup Following her mother s death, June Mei Woo has replaced her mother Suyuan at her monthly mah jong game Suyuan started this game and Joy Luck Club when she first immigrated to the United During high school, when I did not have the life experience to fully appreciate her work, I read each of Amy Tan s books as they came out Now, years later, with many other books and various experiences under my belt, I reread The Joy Luck Club, Tan s first book, as part of my March Women s History Month lineup Following her mother s death, June Mei Woo has replaced her mother Suyuan at her monthly mah jong game Suyuan started this game and Joy Luck Club when she first immigrated to the United States as a way to maintain her Chinese culture in a new country The other families who joined her the Hsus, Jongs, and St Claires became like family as together they celebrated festivals, children s birthdays, and indoctrinated the next generation in Chinese culture Yet, June Mei and her friends from the group, Waverly, Rose, and Lena, for the most part were interested in achieving the American dream, often times at the expense of their mothers who wor...


  2. says:

    Why read The Joy Luck Club Because sometimes one needs to get in touch with his inner Chinese feminine side Amy Tan s most famous book offered ample opportunity in that regard The JLC is all about the relationships between Chinese moms and their daughters Honestly, I picked this up as part of my studies into Chinese culture My brother has been teaching English over there for a few years now and I plan on visiting one day As per usual, I like to read up on a place before the tri...


  3. says:

    After I read The Joy Luck Club summer required reading before sopho English in high school , I started pestering my mom about her abandoned children in mainland China I also declared that I would name my two kids after the aforementioned abandoned children Spring Flower and Spring Rain.My mom laughed in my face about the latter, saying no self respecting Chinese would give their kids such pedestrian names, and would be mock pissed about the former.The truth is that The Joy Luck Club got s After I read The Joy Luck Club summer required reading before sopho English in high school , I started pestering my mom about her abandoned children in mainland China I also declared that I would name my two kids after the aforementioned abandoned children Spring Flower and Spring Rain.My mom laughed in my face about the latter, saying no self respecting Chinese would give their kids such pedestrian names, and would be mock pissed about the former.The truth is that The Joy Luck Club got some things right and got a lot of other things dramatic The stuff that rang the most true with me was the angsty rivalry between Waverly and June particularly June s meltdown at the piano recital a consistent paranoia of mine throughout childhood and Waverly s accus...


  4. says:

    It s not fashionable to profess a liking for The Joy Luck Club In both academic and literary circles, Tan has been maligned for her seeming misandry and racial self loathing, raked across the coals for her largely negative portrayal of Asian Asian American men and for marrying off all her Asian American female characters to white men She s been dismissed for writing chick lit, lightweight family melodrama laced with orientalist cliches She s even been accused of being politically reactionar It s not fashionable to profess a liking for The Joy Luck Club In both academic and literary circles, Tan has been maligned for her seeming misandry and racial self loathing, raked across the coals for her largely negative portrayal of Asian Asian American men and for marrying off all her Asian American female characters to white men She s been dismissed for writing chick lit, lightweight family melodrama laced with orientalist cliches She s even been accused of being politically reactionary As Asian American literature scholar Erin Ninh states in her academic text Ingratitude, The Joy Luck Club conveniently ignores...


  5. says:

    Ok, I admit it, I was obsessed with Amy Tan my first year of college I learned all there was about her, read The Joy Luck Club, and finally I gave up hope.As a freshmen, at Linfield College, I was astonished that Amy Tan could have possibly walked the same hallowed halls of Melrose, perhaps sat in the same offices in the English department, or read a book in Northrup s astro turf room My daydreams were filled with her coming over to my dorm room to have tea and talk literature She would tel Ok, I admit it, I was obsessed with Amy Tan my first year of college I learned all there was about her, read The Joy Luck Club, and finally I gave up hope.As a freshmen, at Linfield College, I was astonished that Amy Tan could have possibly walked the same hallowed halls of Melrose, perhaps sat in the same offices in the English department, or read a book in Northrup s astro turf room My daydreams were filled with her coming over to my dorm room to have tea and talk literature She would tell me what truly inspired her, some secrets and a few great jokes.In reality, I spent a lot of time looking her up in the old yearbooks at the library, Oak Leaves circa 1970 and 1971 I think Horribly despicable I did learn some of her secrets I learned that she never graduated from Linfield, which pretty much means nothingbut I did discover that she possibly met her husband there, Mr Lou DeMattei Also during this first year of Linfield, I got one of those jobs at the PHONE A...


  6. says:

    Those of you who read my blog are most likely aware that my relationship with my mother is not all bouncing bunnies and beautiful butterflies As an American born son raised with traditionally Asian standards, my childhood has been filled with conflicts resulting in screaming matches and bountiful tears So reading The Joy Luck Club by Amy Tan was quite the vicarious experience though I am not Chinese nor a daughter, I could connect to several of the themes that ran throughout the novel.The in Those of you who read my blog are most likely aware that my relationship with my mother is not all bouncing bunnies and beautiful butterflies As an American born son raised with traditionally Asian standards, my childhood has been filled with conflicts resulting in screaming matches and bountiful tears So reading The Joy Luck Club by Amy Tan was quite the vicarious experience though I am not Chinese nor a daughter, I could connect to s...


  7. says:

    I feel a little torn on this one .What I liked I really enjoyed seeing story lines and character relationships come together in the last third of the book The peek into Chinese culture was interesting and new to me I like the idea of mother daughter relationships represented.What I didn t like I don t enjoy waiting until the ...


  8. says:

    5 estrellas y porque no puedo ponerle 5000.


  9. says:

    Amy Tan s very successful first novel was a national best seller, a finalist for the National Book Award, and was made into a movie It is a novel about four Chinese mothers who came to America during World War II, and their four Chinese American daughters The mothers quietly hold on to their past, their culture, and it s traditions, while adapting to their American life They try to pass the essence of what is most important about their old culture on to their daughters, who, being born in Am Amy Tan s very successful first novel was a national best seller, a finalist for the National Book Award, and was made into a movie It is a novel about four Chinese mothers who came to America during World War II, and th...


  10. says:

    I love this book As a first generation child in this country my parents immigrated from Vietnam , I could really relate to the girls in the story I was the girl who played piano, always being forced to practice Although I loved music and was a talented pianist, I quit because I couldn t deal with the pressure any It wasn t for my enjoyment, it was to please my parents or at least that s what it seemed like I think we all have ways of dealing with the pressures of childhood A differe I love this book As a first generation child in this country my parents immigrated from Vietnam , I could really relate to the girls in the story I was the girl who played piano, always being forced to practice Although I loved music and was a talented pianist, I quit because I couldn t deal with the pressure any It wasn t for my enjoyment, it was to please my parents or at least that s what it seemed like I think we all have ways of dealing with the pressures of childhood A difference this book made for me was actually reading about Asian...


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The Joy Luck Club In 1949, Four Chinese Women, Recent Immigrants To San Francisco, Begin Meeting To Eat Dim Sum, Play Mahjong, And Talk United In Shared Loss And Hope, They Call Themselves The Joy Luck Club With Wit And Wisdom, Amy Tan Examines The Sometimes Painful, Often Tender, And Always Deep Connection Between These Four Women And Their American Born Daughters As Each Reveals Her Secrets, Trying To Unravel The Truth About Her Life, The Strings Become Tangled, Entwined